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Welcome Class of 72′ to our Alumni website. Here you can register for an account, take part in our alumni community, read articles, browse photos, and stay in touch. Thanks for visiting.


Class Updates


JOIN US IN MIAMI MARCH 6-8, 2020

March 6-8, 2020 – Miami Mini Reunion

3 days of fun and sun. Reminisce with old friends. Make new friends. Soak up the rich culture of Miami Beach and Miami.
 

BREAKING NEWS: MIAMI REUNION: SPECIAL HOTEL RATE DEADLINE EXTENDED TO FEBRUARY 20!

MINI-REUNION HOTEL:
The Catalina Hotel & Beach Club – 1732 Collins Ave. Miami Beach, FL 33139 305.674.1160 |
Discount Group Rate: $288 (Standard room, King or Double)
· Rates exclude $15.00 resort fee & 14% tax
· Rate based on 2-night Minimum
To reserve your room: Contact hotel & ask for Yale Class of 1972 rate. https://www.southbeachgroup.com/groupevent/index107.html
TENTATIVE PROGRAM:
Friday, March 6, 2020 – Welcome dinner at 6PM – Joe’s Stone Crabs of South Beach
Saturday, March 7
Morning tours:
– Walking tour of Miami Beach’s Art Deco District
– Curator’s tour of Wolfsonian Museum of Art and Design
Lunch: on your own.
Afternoon:
– Tour of the Design and Art Districts of Miami, including a docent led tour of the De la Cruz Collection.
– Visit to Miami’s newest museum, International Contemporary Art Miami.
– Tour of the Wynwood Art District
Cocktails and dinner at Rhouse Wynwood
Sunday, March 8
Morning:
– Visit to the Vizcaya Museum & Gardens
– Brunch at Glass and Vine in the historic Peacock Park, Coconut Grove.
 
 
MINI-REUNION HOTEL:
The Catalina Hotel & Beach Club – 1732 Collins Ave. Miami Beach, FL 33139 305.674.1160 |
Discount Group Rate: $288 (Standard room, King or Double)
· Rates exclude $15.00 resort fee & 14% tax
· Rate based on 2-night Minimum
Note: This rate is only available for reservations made prior to 2/6/19.
To reserve your room: Contact hotel & ask for Yale Class of 1972 rate:  https://www.southbeachgroup.com/groupevent/index107.html
 
 
FLIGHTS:
You can fly to either Miami or Fort Lauderdale (about a 40 minute ride to Miami Beach.) All major airlines have flights to either or both of these airports.
 
COST OF THE MINI-REUNION:
Per person: $400
Includes Friday night, Saturday night, and Sunday brunch meals. Alcoholic beverages not included for Joes Stone Crab and Glass and Vine restaurants but 1 cocktail included for RHOUSE. Also includes transportation from reunion hotels to Friday night dinner and tour locations Design District, Wynnwood Art District and Vizcaya, tour guides for Saturday and Sunday, and museum fees. Does not include transportation to and from the airport.
 
TOTAL COST:
We estimate total costs for one person will be about $1750, which includes the $400 mini-reunion fee, $700 for two nights of hotel, an estimate of $450 for roundtrip airfare, and $200 for miscellaneous expenses. For a couple, we estimate total costs will be about $2700, which includes $800 for the mini-reunion fee, $900 for roundtrip airfare, $700 for two nights of hotel, and $300 for miscellaneous expenses. These costs will vary depending on your actual airfare.
 
HOW TO REGISTER:
 
 
QUESTIONS:
Contact Andrew Capitman (SM), Mini-reunion chair at
andrew.capitman@icloud.com

SAVE THE DATE: March 6-8, 2020 – Yale Class of 1972 Miami Mini Reunion

Register Now! Our registration link is now live:
SAVE THE DATE: March 6-8, 2020
Yale Class of 1972 Miami Mini Reunion
Join your classmates for 3 days of fun and sun. Reminisce with old friends. Make new friends. Soak up the rich culture of South Beach.
Highlights include private insider tours:
· Miami Beach Art Deco District
· Wolfsonian Art Deco Museum
· Wynnwood art district
More highlights!
– Boat tour of Miami harbor and celebrity homes
– Free time for golf, beach, and strolling in South beach
– Enjoy Miami’s fabulous and diverse cuisine
STAY TUNED FOR MORE DETAILS

Join Your Classmates at the YALE CLASS OF 1972 CLASS LUNCH

Check back here for announcements about the next YALE CLASS OF 1972 CLASS LUNCH
NEXT LUNCH:
Announcing
Another YALE CLASS OF 1972 Class Lunch
WHO: All classmates invited
WHEN: Wednesday, February 5th from Noon to 2:00 PM
WHERE: The Grill Room at the Yale Club
50 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York, NY 10017
RSVP: Via this Evite

PLAN FOR CLASS OF 1972 EVENTS ANNOUNCED BY ROB BILDNER

Dear Classmates,

If you were there, did you enjoy our 45threunion in 2017 and our cluster reunion with the classes of ’71 and ’73 in 2015? As I think about our 50threunion, I would like to spend more time with classmates before that event in May 2022, when most of us will have turned 70 (hard to believe). After much discussion, your class officers and I have decided to do something about this: We are proposing a series of class gatherings to be held over the next 3 years across the country. While we think we have a terrific plan, we can’t make it happen without your help!

Here are the details:

We are hoping to hold two different kinds of class events:

(1) Mini-reunions. These would be held in interesting places and venues and would require travel for most people. Our guess is that 50 classmates or so might attend each of these events. The following are either being planned or proposed:

– Miami. (Targeted for February 2020.) I am thrilled to announce that our classmate Andrew Capitman, whose mother Barbara was responsible for preserving Miami Beach’s art deco architecture, has agreed to chair this event. Classmates will be responsible for paying for their transportation, lodging and meals for these mini-reunions. The class will offer some financial assistance for those who request it.

– The Berkshires. (Targeted for summer 2021.) The Berkshires of western Massachusetts are the summer home of the Boston Symphony at Tanglewood, an extraordinary venue in a spectacular outdoor setting. Beyond Tanglewood, there are many great cultural resources and sites in the area, more than enough to justify a visit. We need a chair for this event. Are you in a position to volunteer?

– Others. I have been in discussion with classmates in the past about possible mini-reunions in other locations, including Cleveland and New York. I’m sure some of you have ideas about other possible locations. Our first step in considering locations for mini-reunions is that we find a classmate to chair the event. Please let us know if you would be willing to chair an event in your area. 

(2) “72 @ 70” Gatherings. These would be informal, smaller gatherings of perhaps 20 – 25 classmates each in honor of the 70thbirthday we are celebrating before or around the time of the 50th reunion.  This type of event was done very successfully by the Class of 1970. (Check out https://at70.org/) These could be anything from a cocktail party and/or informal dinner to a gathering at a lecture or a cultural or sports event and could be held at any time between now and our 50threunion. They could also be group community service events done in conjunction with the Yale Day of Service (May 11 this year) or at another time of year. Our thought is that these celebrations would be held all around the country. We don’t envision classmates traveling great distances to attend these events; rather, we think of them as gatherings organized by a classmate in the area for other classmates who live in the general vicinity. As you know, our class is committed to assisting all classmates to attend our reunions regardless of financial circumstances, and so we are also prepared to make a subsidy available for the “72 @ 70 events.

We are excited about our plan for class activities between now and our 50threunion, but we need your help to make it all happen. Specifically, we need chairs and champions for these events. In other words, we need you to step up and help organize one of these events. Your class officers and the YAA staff will assist you. I am happy to speak to you further about any leadership role you would be willing to assume.

On behalf of the Class Officers and Class Council, I thank you for your consideration and hope to hear from you!

Best wishes,

Rob

Rob Bildner

Class Secretary

P.S., Bill Fowkes, our class Corresponding Secretary, has asked me to remind you that we have two active on-line class communities and to urge you to take advantage of both of them. Our class Facebook page has been replaced by a Facebook Group (Yale University Class of 1972 Facebook Group), which enables anybody in the class to post content. If you visit the Group, you’ll see lots of posts and some energetic comments back and forth among classmates. Meanwhile, our class website (yale72.org) continues to present and store lots of updates and information on classmates and class events. (Content for the website is posted and managed by Bill. Send any updates you would like him to post to williamfowkes@aya.yale.edu.)


DONATE TO THE CLASS OF 1972 WOMEN’S SCHOLAR SHIP FUND

HOW TO DONATE:
To donate make checks payable to Yale University. In the memo line, write “Class of 1972 Women’s Scholarship Fund.” Check the “Other” box and write in the exact name of the fund. Online follow the directions at https://secure.yale.imodules.com/s/1667/giving/17/form.aspx…
When you receive your tax receipt/thank-you letter, make sure it specifically references this fund. Please note that contributions to the Class of 1972 Women’s Scholarship Fund do not count toward annual fund credit but do count toward reunion class credit.

ANOTHER WAY TO GIVE–Consider making a bequest to the Class of ’72 Women’s Scholarship Fund: Designate the exact name of the fund, the Class of ’72 Women’s Scholarship Fund, at Yale University, in your will. If interested, you may also contact Mary Beth Congdon at Marybeth.congdon@yale.edu in the planned giving office.

FROM CAROL WHITEHEAD:
“Sixteen years ago the women of the Class of 1972 created an endowed scholarship for transfer students called The Yale ’72 Women’s Scholarship Fund. The recipient for the past three years has been Rona Ji ’18. She transferred to Yale as a sophomore, like the women of 1972 who started this scholarship in 2002 in honor of our 30th Reunion. Rona has embraced all that Yale has to offer. She recently graduated with a dual major in economics and ethnicity, race, and migration. Her most rewarding experience outside the classroom was with Yale Building Bridges, which brings high-achieving college students to teach English in rural China. Rona helped expand this program to deal with mental health and gender equality. She has given back to the local community by tutoring through New Haven Reads. Rona has been involved in the Yale China Economic Forum, and spent a semester abroad in Beijing. A talented musician as well, Rona played the flute with the Yale Band in Australia following graduation. Later this summer she will teach in the Yale Young Global Scholars Program, before starting her MBA at the Yale School of Management with a view to working in US and Chinese commerce relations. Cynthia Brill, Carol Whitehead, Ann Linden and Connie Royster have been involved in shepherding the fund over the years. It now has over $300,000 in assets with contributions from many of our pioneering class of women, and has provided scholarship assistance to numerous talented women transfer students. This scholarship fund continues to accept donations. Thank you!”


The Missing Class Notes

The Yale Alumni Magazine has informed us that the company that handles the mailing of the magazine mixed up their mailing lists and sent out the wrong version of the September/October issue of YAM to Yale College alums–a version without our class notes. They promise to send everyone a print copy of the missing notes in the near future. In the meantime, here are the notes for the Class of 1972:

William Ivor Fowkes, Corresponding Secretary, E-mail: williamfowkes@aya.yale.edu

Dear Classmates,

To state the obvious—modes of communication evolve. Just as most of us write very few letters these days, opting instead for emails or text messages, so, apparently, many of us prefer newer ways to keep in touch with our fellow classmates. All of which is a convoluted way of saying that I’ve received no news—none—directly from members of our class in the two months since the last edition of these notes were submitted to the Yale Alumni Magazine. However, that doesn’t mean I’ve been completely in the dark. Fortunately our relatively new Yale Class of 1972 Facebook Group (which is replacing our Facebook Page, soon to go dark) is providing a forum that classmates seem increasingly comfortable using as our main communication medium. So, here’s some news gleaned from the Group:

Connie Royster (JE)and Elizabeth Spahn (TC)attended a Yale Alumni Service Corps trip to Cape Town, South Africa—or more specifically, the township of Philippi. This trip represented the Corps’ first work in an urban rather than rural setting. According to the Corps’ website, the work involved a local non-profit founded by a Yale graduate whose mission is to help local community entities empower citizens to gain equal access to quality education opportunities. Connie and Elizabeth don’t provide many details in their postings—and I look forward to hearing much more about their experience—but they do provide a video of a local community choir serenading them and a photo of Connie in South African garb.

Also posted is a fascinating chain of comments about coeducation sparked by a posting by Lars Grape (CC). Lars started out in the class of 1971, but after a year spent back in his homeland, Sweden, returned to a campus that had gone coed in his absence. Comments on the change included Marianna Steriadis’s (JE)observation that, after four years at an all-girls private prep school, it was “like going to heaven.” Meanwhile, Cal Nordt (JE)reports that after being in coed public schools all his life, he found that something was missing in the classes he attended his freshman year. From some of the comments you get a sense of the empowerment we felt back in those days, since people are convinced that coeducation happened because we the students demanded it. While some accounts elsewhere suggest that there were many other factors at work in the decision, my own recollection of those days confirms that Yale did make many of us feel as if they did listen to us—on this and many other issues—and that we ran the place. This recollection stands in contrast to my experience at other colleges and universities where it seemed as if the administration or the faculty held the balance of power. With all of this as background, we look forward to the celebrations planned for next year, the 50thanniversary of coeducation at Yale College. Please share any thoughts you may have about the anniversary or your time at Yale during that transition.

Since I haven’t received any emails lately and just shared the best posts from our class Facebook Group, I’ll now turn to one last fount of information about classmates, though somewhat less timely—our Reunion Yearbook. If you haven’t already looked it over, I encourage you to do so now. Here are some interesting tidbits I found:

Scott Addison (MC): In the “Life Since Graduation” section, he writes, “. . . In mid-’96, drawn to St. Louis by Rainbow Gatherings in legal crisis (and a redhead): launched Fed lawsuits against police roadblocks on public assembly (MO’96, FL’98), then settled in to anchor research & outreach—and traveled widely supporting 1stAmendment cases & related civil rights projects all over the country. Rivermont ’07 – a hobbit house by the River north of St. Loo – a craftsman’s scholarly life, building and writing; still doing the Gatherings’ legal work, got deep in Occupy St., Ferguson, urban issues & land trusts. Woods out back; music down the road, friends around town…Family far but still close, keeping up with old chums & lovers.”

Vicki Jane Hammond (DC):“In many respects, my life started when I moved to California in 1977. Perfect place for me, at a perfect time. First, right in San Francisco, living in a funky warehouse space. Then in a houseboat in Sausalito, with my office in a shipyard, watching brown pelicans from my windows. Half that space for painting, half for my freelance work. And rowing in an open-water single scull when I seemed to have Richardson Bay all to myself. That California is gone now, and I recently moved further north. Still doing the same work—and nearly finished writing a novel (a long-delayed goal).”

Matthew Frederick Lopes, Jr. (PC):“Most of my life, and that of my wife, was spent in New Haven having been born, both of us, at Grace New Haven Hospital now Yale-New Haven Hospital. Working for Yale, the State, and City of New Haven has been fulfilling. Upon reaching retirement, we decided to move to somewhere without snow and ice. We chose Costa Rica and have settled into a comfortable life with many American and Costa Rican friends over the past six years.”

Karen Jane Daykin Youngstrom (ES):We left the city (Shaker Heights outside of Cleveland) and built a home on 15 acres in somewhat rural Wyoming. Surrounded by beautiful scenery, we rise at dawn to a beautiful sunrise nearly every day, and enjoy caring for our horses, pastures, and garden. Never a dull moment.”

Finally, a Yearbook entry that seems apt for our current political climate. William Nemir (CC): In the “Professional/Volunteer Career” section, he writes, “I spent much of my professional life advising publicly elected boards—helping them reconcile divergent views and find a way to keep working in the face of mounting political pressures. I saw both gratifying generosity of spirit and painful weakness of character in the process. Sometimes in the same people. It was an education.”

Until next time: please share any news you have so that I can post it on our class website and/or in these bimonthly class notes—or go ahead and post it directly on our Facebook Group.

Cheers,

WIF

 


HIGHLIGHT FROM THE 45th REUNION BOOK: Alyse Otvos Baker (SM)

“An apt metaphor for life since graduation might be that of a rubber band ball. Each experience—graduate school, internship, career, continuing ed, research, children, companion animals, loss of family members, relationships, moves—has added a different component. Some “bands” have fit better than others. Some have been glorious, some disastrous; but the trick has been to keep moving, regardless of the degree of success or challenge. I do not feel “finished” yet with any undertaking. I would like to live long enough to see the planet, especially the USA, return to sanity; to witness a resumption of efforts to preserve the delicate ecology of our “pale blue dot”; to have reason to hope that my children, as well as everyone else’s children, will be able to navigate safely through the present and future.”


HIGHLIGHT FROM THE 45th REUNION BOOK: David Raymond Lasker (PC)

“I’m a single divorced active bi-guy who rotates musician, writer, editor, PR and photography careers. After 10 years in the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, I moved to Toronto in 1984 to be an architectural journalist. It was great timing—I had arrived during the golden age of journalism and the phone never stopped ringing. After taking a buyout at THE GLOBE AND MAIL in 1998 to get away from the philistine boss from hell, I turned down an offer from THE TORONTO STAR to be Entertainment Editor. No way was I going to listen to pop and schlock, or read PEOPLE magazine! Moving as Editor to CANADIAN INTERIORS in 1999, I started the Scene event-photography section (showcasing design-related parties) to stroll stealthily for PR clients. My publisher pestered me to take better photos, so I learned how; now photography is an income stream. I don’t foresee retiring, ever . . . In Canada, unlike in the U.S., I’ve never gone to a cocktail party or dinner where healthcare was on anyone’s conversation radar screen . . . “

           


HIGHLIGHT FROM THE 45th REUNION BOOK: Vincent Neil Palladino (MC)

“Since retiring I have written the first three books in a private detective series entitled The Dark Quartet (and could use a good agent!). I paint and sculpt in wood and stone and have had my work displayed at juried shows in Connecticut . . I am retired from the practice of intellectual property law with first Fish & Neave and later Ropes & Gray in New York City. My wife Laurel and I divide our time between homes in Manhattan and Madison, Connecticut. Our daughter Alissa lives and works at a non-profit in Atlanta where she recently appeared on Fox News on behalf of the organization. Our daughter Samantha lives and practices law with a large firm in New York City. Neither is married—yet—much to my wife’s dismay.”

         


HIGHLIGHT FROM THE 45th REUNION BOOK: Scott Addison (MC)

In the “Life Since Graduation” section, Scott Addison (MC) writes, “. . . In mid-’96, drawn to St. Louis by Rainbow Gatherings in legal crisis (and a redhead): launched Fed lawsuits against police roadblocks on public assembly (MO’96, FL’98), then settled in to anchor research & outreach—and traveled widely supporting 1stAmendment cases & related civil rights projects all over the country. Rivermont ’07 – a hobbit house by the River north of St. Loo – a craftsman’s scholarly life, building and writing; still doing the Gatherings’ legal work, got deep in Occupy St., Ferguson, urban issues & land trusts. Woods out back; music down the road, friends around town…Family far but still close, keeping up with old chums & lovers.”


HIGHLIGHT FROM THE 45th REUNION BOOK: Vicki Jane Hammond (DC)

In the “Life Since Graduation” section of her page in the 45th Reunion Book, Vicki Jane Hammond (DC) writes“In many respects, my life started when I moved to California in 1977. Perfect place for me, at a perfect time. First, right in San Francisco, living in a funky warehouse space. Then in a houseboat in Sausalito, with my office in a shipyard, watching brown pelicans from my windows. Half that space for painting, half for my freelance work. And rowing in an open-water single scull when I seemed to have Richardson Bay all to myself. That California is gone now, and I recently moved further north. Still doing the same work—and nearly finished writing a novel (a long-delayed goal).”

 


HIGHLIGHT FROM THE 45th REUNION BOOK: Matthew Frederick Lopes, Jr. (PC)

In the “Life Since Graduation” section of his page in the 45th Reunion Book, Matthew Frederick Lopes, Jr. (PC) writes“Most of my life, and that of my wife, was spent in New Haven having been born, both of us, at Grace New Haven Hospital now Yale-New Haven Hospital. Working for Yale, the State, and City of New Haven has been fulfilling. Upon reaching retirement, we decided to move to somewhere without snow and ice. We chose Costa Rica and have settled into a comfortable life with many American and Costa Rican friends over the past six years.”

 


HIGHLIGHT FROM THE 45th REUNION BOOK: Karen Jane Daykin Youngstrom (ES)

On her page in the 45th Reunion Book, Karen Jane Daykin Youngstrom (ES) writesWe left the city (Shaker Heights outside of Cleveland) and built a home on 15 acres in somewhat rural Wyoming. Surrounded by beautiful scenery, we rise at dawn to a beautiful sunrise nearly every day, and enjoy caring for our horses, pastures, and garden. Never a dull moment.”

 


HIGHLIGHT FROM THE 45th REUNION BOOK: William Nemir (CC)

In the “Professional/Volunteer Career” section of his page in the 45th Reunion Book, William Nemir (CC) writes: “I spent much of my professional life advising publicly elected boards—helping them reconcile divergent views and find a way to keep working in the face of mounting political pressures. I saw both gratifying generosity of spirit and painful weakness of character in the process. Sometimes in the same people. It was an education.”


Yale Reunion

Reunion Links

AGING WELL PANEL: Thursday, June 1, 2017.:

Mick Smyer’s (BK) presentation, “Is There a Secret to Aging Well?”  the class of 1972’s AGING WELL panel at our 45th reunion. Mick, Professor of Psychology at Bucknell University, has provided us with his slides. Click here: 6-1-17SmyerAgingYale72PDF

Here is the full article that formed the basis of Mick’s presentation:  https://www.thesolutionsjournal.com/article/how-shall-we-age/

Helen Kivnick (ES), Professor of Social Work, University of Minnesota, gave a presentation at the AGING WELL panel at our Class of 1972 45th Reunion, June 1, 2017. Here are the slides from her presentation: https://yale72.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/KivnickAgingWellFrYOU-6-1-17notes.pdf

REUNION PHOTOShttps://yale72.org/photo-galleries/reunion-photos/

PERSONAL REMEMBRANCES FROM THE 45TH REUNION MEMORIAL SERVICE: https://yale72.org/notes/personal-remembrances-45th-reunion-memorial-service/ 



Cluster Reunion Wins Aya Award

Our Cluster Reunion with the classes of 1971 & 1973 (YALE 2015: REDISCOVER AND RECONNECT: A Special Event for the Classes of 1971, 1972, & 1973, New Haven, CT, October 1-3, 2015) has been awarded the Outstanding Class Event in a Non-Reunion Year Award by the AYA. The award will be presented at the Yale Assembly Board of Governors Excellence Award Ceremony on Thursday, November 10, 2016 from 5:30-7:00PM in the President’s Room at Woolsey Hall at Yale. Congratulations to all who planned and /or attended the mini-reunion.
– Yale News article about the mini-reunion: click here.
– Photos from this historic event: click here for full photo gallery.

 

DSC02425-small

Members of the planning and steering committees for Yale 2015: Rediscover and Reconnect: (left to right) Bill Fowkes (’72 Corresponding Secretary), Rob Bildner (’72 Secretary + Chair of Mini-Reunion), Pat Pinnell ’71, Connie Royster ’72, Andrea DaRif (’73 Secretary), Andy Kaufman (’71 Secretary), Nina Glickson ’73, Roger Rosenthal (’72 AYA Representative), Frank Krejci (’72 Treasurer). NOT IN PHOTO: Andrew Capitman ’72, Katy Lewis (’71 Treasurer), Al Shamash (’73 Treasurer).

Website Tip – How To Find Obituaries Of Class Members

How To Find Obituaries Of Class Members:

To see RECENT OBITUARIES of class members, go to the menu item “In Memoriam” under “CLASS NEWS” in the righthand column on every page. To see ALL OBITUARIES, go to the menu item “In Memoriam” in the drop-down menu under “THE CLASS” in the blue heading on every page.